The Bystander Effect: Why Some People Act and Others Don't

When we wait for everyone to act, we just keep waiting. We want to believe if we see something, we will say something or do something. But the more people there are, the less likely we are to help someone in need. This social psychological phenomenon is called the “Bystander Effect.” Factors such as fear, ambiguity, affinity, and diffusion of responsibility determine whether a bystander acts. As an Attorney, bias and harassment trainer and a mom, Kelly Charles-Collins, shares everyday examples of the bystander effect and solutions for creating a Bystander Free Zone: Stand up, Speak up, Act up.  

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Kelly Charles-Collins
Words Have Power

October 2001 – my mother was diagnosed with stage 3 breast cancer.

I was devastated. My mom, not so much. A woman of great strength and character, she wasn’t going to let cancer get in her way.

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Kelly Charles-Collins
"I Don't See Color."​ Why You Should.

I was attending a luncheon being hosted by a Black Bar Association during primary season for elections. A White male colleague who was running for judge approached me. He was so excited to share why I should support him. He began his pitch my telling what seat he was running for and transitioned to explaining his legal background.

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Kelly Charles-Collins
The Bystander Effect: What Would You Do?

Last week, I shared with you Part 1 of my 3-part series on the social psychological phenomenon called the "Bystander Effect." As I mentioned, I had the privilege of sharing my expertise on this topic during my TEDx talk at TEDx Ocala this month. But because that talk is less than 15 minutes, I wanted to give those who are not as familiar with the topic some additional context before listening to my talk.

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The Lyfe Magazine Editorial: Woman Up!

” I don’t cheat to win. I’d rather lose,” said  23-time Grand Slam champion Serena Williams to her male umpire at the US Open. Serena was defending her character and integrity in the face of what she believed was an accusation of cheating.

Standing up for yourself is a good thing. Right? We always tell boys and men to “Man Up!” Surely, it must be okay for women and girls to “Woman Up.”

Think again.

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Kelly Charles-CollinsComment